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09-01-2023 08:14

Francisco  SÃNCHEZ Francisco SÁNCHEZ

Ascomiceto anaranjado sobre suelo desnudo, 29/12/2

27-05-2024 22:10

Ethan Crenson

Hi everyone, I found these lovely stipitate ascos

26-05-2024 12:05

Alain Delannoy

Bonjour,Je n'arrive pas à mettre un nom sur cette

25-05-2024 16:40

Sylvie Le Goff

Bonjourj'aimerais confirmation ou pas pour ce peti

25-05-2024 18:29

Malcolm  Greaves Malcolm Greaves

I found a group of Mitrula gracilis? on wet debris

25-05-2024 16:54

Sylvie Le Goff

Bonjour j'aimerais confirmation ou infirmation de

22-05-2024 23:39

Marc Detollenaere Marc Detollenaere

Dear Forum,On debarked Fagus I found some small wh

21-05-2024 17:48

Karl Soler Kinnerbäck

Hi all,Could this be Venturioscypha or Venturiocis

21-05-2024 11:33

Nihad Omerovic

Hello,found on dead, dry, attached (and fallen) tw

07-11-2018 08:34

Zuzana Sochorová (Egertová) Zuzana Sochorová (Egertová)

Hello, could someone send this publication to me

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Two observations appear to be more Hyaloscypha fuckelii
B Shelbourne, 25-03-2024 13:41
B Shelbourne• Hyaloscyphaceae (no VBs), Hyaloscypha: Macro and habitat, confirmed by spores and hairs (and paraphyses).
• H. fuckelii: Croziers, IKI bb and dextrinoid contents in hairs and paraphyses, spore size and ellipsoid-cylindrical shape, narrowly conical to lageniform hairs with thin-walls and light encrustation in water, some hairs septate or with apical knobs, some hyaline exudate, on +/- bulky deciduous wood.
• Frequent appearance in March seems to fit with Huhtinen's description of March-June as the peak season.
• In all three recent collections, some spores are longer or wider than Huhtinen's ranges for fresh in water (n = 30), although for CB + MLZ are more fitting (n = 604). The spores are also slightly wider on average compared to Huhtinen's measurements.
• Some apothecia in first observation overtaken by +/- localised white fluffy mycelium.
• Last observation on the ground often has less noticable hairs in macro, and more yellowish exudate in macro and micro.


Habitat: Two observations within 100 m, on decorticated deciduous wood, no bodies of water in the immediate vicinity, in mixed deciduous woodland, southern England, mid-March, after generally wet weather.
• Observation 1: Inside a tree hollow, on brittle and blackened wood, sheltered under the overhang, ~2 m from the ground, in the trunk of a large Betula pendula, tree living and standing, damp when observed but possibly xeric.
• Observation 2: On a log on the floor, ~20 cm diameter, often on thick algae/biofilm, unidentified deciduous wood, with heavily decayed and pitted surface, appears hygric.

Associates:


• Obs 1: Dematiaceous fungi, algae, bryophytes.
• Obs 2: Algae/biofilm.

Storage and methods: +/- half sections from a single mature-looking apothecium in each collection examined, mounted in tap water, some squashing to separate cells, IKI or KOH added to the same mount.

Measurements of vital spores in water mount or asci:


• Collection 1: (5.8) 6.1 - 8.6 (9.9) × (2) 2.2 - 2.7 (3.3) µm, Q = (2.3) 2.5 - 3.7 (4.9), N = 41, Me = 7.3 × 2.4 µm, Qe = 3.
• Collection 2: (5.5) 6.2 - 7.8 (8.9) × (2.1) 2.2 - 2.7 (2.9) µm, Q = (2.1) 2.5 - 3.2 (3.7), N = 26, Me = 7 × 2.5 µm, Qe = 2.8.

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Hans-Otto Baral, 25-03-2024 16:26
Hans-Otto Baral
Re : Two observations appear to be more Hyaloscypha fuckelii
In your last docu you had also spores up to 10 µm and also up to 2.7 µm. A brief look in my data shows spores usually not exceeding about 9 x 2.5 µm, but I think your specimens are still typical.
B Shelbourne, 26-03-2024 18:33
B Shelbourne
Re : Two observations appear to be more Hyaloscypha fuckelii
Thank you.

I think I need to be more careful about how I measure small spores. The estimates were ok for identification but not more detailed comparison. In future I will be more careful about measuring small spores unless I have a very clear and flat view with oil immersion.

I have reviewed the measurements more carefully, and most spores are indeed smaller than 9 x 2.5 µm, but a small number (< 5%) do seem to measure slightly longer.


Current collection 1: (6) 6.2 - 9.1 (9.3) × 2 - 2.4 (2.5) µm, Q = (2.6) 2.9 - 3.8 (4.2), N = 20, Me = 7.3 × 2.2 µm, Qe = 3.3.


Current collection 2: (5.6) 5.9 - 8.6 (8.9) × (1.9) 1.91 - 2.2 (2.3) µm, Q = (2.8) 2.9 - 4 (4.1), N = 14, Me = 7 × 2.1 µm, Qe = 3.3.


Previous in vitro collection: (6.4) 7 - 8.9 (9.9) × (1.9) 2.2 - 2.48 (2.5) µm, Q = (2.8) 3 - 3.8 (4.5), N = 36, Me = 7.9 × 2.3 µm, Qe = 3.4.

Hans-Otto Baral, 26-03-2024 20:24
Hans-Otto Baral
Re : Two observations appear to be more Hyaloscypha fuckelii
Now the spore size is quite o.k. for fuckelii. But extremes can always show up.

You use piximeter or do you calculate? For me 2.48 amd 2.5 is the same. Whether a spore is 2.4 or 2.5 µm wide is still not really possible to decide. When you measure from a photo you are not sure if you see the widest part of the spore because you see only an optical section at a given level.

But for measurements below 10-15 µm I recommend at least to measure at a 0.2 µm exactness.
B Shelbourne, 27-03-2024 02:26
B Shelbourne
Re : Two observations appear to be more Hyaloscypha fuckelii
Thank you, that advice is useful.

I use piximetre to measure from photos. In some ways it helps to accurately measure the lines and get perpendicular axes, but it is reliant on the photo resolving the correct part of the spore as you mention.


Those results are copied directly from piximetre, but I would usually report to one decimal place as it does seem impossible to be sure about further distinction under the microscope.


I guess distinguishing between 2.4 and 2.5 um at 1000x is essentially distinguishing between 2.4 and 2.5 mm, which is certainly hard even at close reading distance. It is easier at higher levels of magnification but then the resolution of the microscope image is not sufficient.

Hans-Otto Baral, 27-03-2024 08:37
Hans-Otto Baral
Re : Two observations appear to be more Hyaloscypha fuckelii
Yes, and I think when we measure 2.4 it could also be 2.5, but we can surley distinguish between 2.3 and 2.5, so the 0.1 µm step is usually a guess, unless we have structures around 1 µm or smaller. I feel that many workers do not think procentual when saying that an ascus is 65.8 µm long. Piximeter gives such values, but we must round this to 66 µm to make it easier for the reader.